Dental Bone Loss

 

The bone is a living structure, which is continuously in a process of remodeling, because throughout life we reabsorb old bone tissue and create new bone constantly. Of course, aging, certain diseases or even dental losses can influence this remodeling is complicated, making dental bone loss is aggravated and occurs at a higher rate.

The bone is a living structure, which is continuously in a process of remodeling, because throughout life we reabsorb old bone tissue and create new bone constantly. Of course, aging, certain diseases or even dental losses can influence this remodeling is complicated, making dental bone loss is aggravated and occurs at a higher rate.

In this article we will see the keys of this physiological process that affects a large number of patients that come with the dentists of Tijuana Dental Studio.

What are the most common causes of dental bone loss?

We can distinguish between physiological bone loss by atrophy, associated with aging and loss of teeth, and bone loss associated with pathologies that can be caused by a disease that affects the oral environment, such as periodontitis, or systemic diseases whose effects lead to a Bone loss or a lack of development of the jaws among other general symptoms, such as osteoporosis.

What symptoms can alert us to its existence?

It must be said that bone loss can go completely unnoticed by the patient. Of course, the clearest symptom (and usually with a bad prognosis) is dental mobility caused by advanced stages of periodontal disease. Other symptoms prior to mobility may be the perception of longer teeth, with the consequent increase in tooth sensitivity or the appearance of black triangles between the teeth. That is why we always insist on regular visits to the dentist, since he can identify these symptoms early and act accordingly.

And in the case of patients with dental losses?

In areas where the patient has lost parts, as a result of a tooth extraction or trauma, it is common to notice the area more depressed and concave with respect to adjacent areas with teeth and suffer food retention in the area. If we talk about people who have chosen to rehabilitate their teeth using removable acrylic prostheses (dentures), what they can notice is that the prosthesis that previously adapted well to your mouth, after bone loss, moves preventing a proper chewing.

Is it important that we replenish the pieces to stop bone loss?

Yes effectively. The maxillary bone needs the stimulus that provides the loads and tensions coming from the mastication so that it is not reabsorbed to a greater extent of the bone that is applied. So when the teeth are missing, the maxillary and mandibular bone tend to reabsorb more easily.

Regardless of our case, is there any option to recover the lost bone?

If we talk about bone loss caused by periodontal disease there are some specific types of bone defects in the teeth that are regenerable by periodontal regenerative surgery techniques. These techniques allow to stabilize and lengthen the useful life of the teeth of a patient affected by periodontitis.

When there is a bone loss in an edentulous area and the patient wishes to be rehabilitated with dental implants, it is possible that there is not enough support for fixing them. In these cases, different solutions can be studied by a specialist, including reconstructive surgery using bone grafts, either from the patient himself (autograft), from a donor (allograft), materials from another animal species previously treated and processed. (xenograft) and even of synthetic origin (alloplastic).